Skip to main content

About your Search

English 30
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the government, the current effort in afghanistan and condition of the u.s. economy, all referenced in the president's speech. here is how you can talk to us the first half hour. president obama saying last night it is time to turn the page. your interpretation of that. phone, e-mail, or twitter. again, if you want to give an e- mail, and twitter, go to twitter and then c-spanwj. "the washington post" use is that " for its story tonight. turning to "the new york times." and going to "usa today" -- again, the president quote. conn. mary on hours democrats line. caller: good morning, pedro. i wanted to say how proud i am of president obama fulfilling another of his campaign commitments. i wish to the iraqi people well in governing themselves. and i agree with the president that it is time that we concentrates on our economy and what happened to the people in the middle class. i hope he does stand strong on inundating -- eliminating the tax credit that was given to the very wealthy, by discontinuing that at the end of the year. host: raleigh, north carolina. john, re
, everyone, this tuesday morning. today on "washington journal," we want to get your thoughts on the right u.s. education system, the problems and solutions. president obama yesterday talking about the issue, saying we need to add one month to the school year, citing competitive nest for the united states. also, you have seen it on msnbc, and democratic candidates are talking about the issue as well. so it is your turn this morning to weigh in. what of the problems and solutions? all numbers are on your screen right there. we will get to your calls in just a minute. and remember, you can send us a or an e-mail. let me show you this headline. "new york daily news." let's add a month to the school year. year. the president backs and longer school year. then also the front page of the story, the president saying the d.c. public schools don't add up to private education. that is from the present yesterday as well. then there is a "the washington post" this morning with the headline. democratic candidates blast the gop over education policies, in search of a rallying issue. it looks like candidates
probably knows more about these issues than many of us combined. he will be joining us. >> the aclu and the drug policy alliance are advocating for federal legislative change. my coalition co-chair will be talking about litigation and state reforms. i am going to focus on the federal and legislative response, some of the history, and details about what i am talking about today. the aclu were some federal disenfranchisement from three angles. we litigate in court, will lobby in federal and state legislatures, and we engage in public education. as we face another important election, there are an estimated 5.3 million americans who will not be able to vote because of the result of criminal convictions. this is despite the fact that the supreme court repeatedly has said that voting is a fundamental right. most with criminal convictions are barred from the polls. 48 out of 50 states have laws that bar citizens with criminal convictions from bidding in some manner. two other states permanently in franchise criminals with felony convictions. there are 5.3 million americans who cannot vote.
this morning is what is america's core competency in your mind. if you would like to tell us how that can be nurtured by our leaders, we would like to hear that as well where we are going to get to your calls right away if we can get our producers to get some calls on the line while we are talking to you about america's core competency. we went to wikipedia which, as you know, is the self edited by people all rumble world really -- all are around the world really. we want to give you some statistics about the united states for its land mass. over 3.79 million square miles. 300 million people. the united states is the third or fourth largest country by a total area and the third largest both by land area of population. it is one of the world's most ethnically diverse and multi- cultural nations, the product of a large-scale immigration from many countries. the u.s. economy is the world's largest national gdp of $14.30 trillion and a quarter of the nominal global gdp and one-fifth of the gdp at purchasing power parity. that is the size and the economics of the united states. one of the poss
on for a time frame, even though the dispersant used was pre authorized, the issue that seemed to be elevated to a national response team in washington at some point, a decision was made that the epa should play a more active role, then call for. on may 20, and you advised bp to reduce the application of dispersant and provide the availability of less toxic dispersants. please help us understand your concerns and the process you went through in conjunction with the other federal agencies. the epa had more of a commanding role than anticipated than in the area contingency plan. is there some recommendation you can provide to us about what kind of guideline that we might recommend that would elevate the decision making to more routine decisions of these dispersants to these extraordinary kinds of decisions? >> thanks. i will probably end where you ended. there is a need for those kinds of guidelines. every day you make the decisions that are before you. over time, one of the things i discussed often is duke are not only looking at the decision before you that today, but also at the response. fr
. thanks for joining us on "america live." i'm rick folbaum. harris: i'm harris faulkner. we got the video the president leaving for milwaukee wisconsin as the administration tries to improve the job picture for thousands of out of work americans this holiday. rick: combine the under der employed with the unemployed and you have one in every five american workers with either no job or working below their potential. nearly 3 million people unemployed for up to six months, more than 6 million people unemployed for more than six months. kelly wright is live at the white house to tell us what the labor department announced today. kelly, nice to see you. >> reporter: nice to see you as well. the labor department is indeed concerned about the numbers you just mentioned. it's 9.6% unemployment out there. that is not good at all. the labor department wants to do something about it. labor secretary hilda solis going on record talking about it today, releasing a video stating that this is the state of the american worker, and in it she talks about ha that she like the president is expressing that th
not trust us, they will not keep coming back. continue >> and a month-long look at privacy in communications policy. >> the c-span video library is a great resource to see what is happening in washington. find the most recent events covered, those most watched, and most covered -- all free. >> governor tim pawlenty is widely considered to be contemplating a presidential run in 2012. he recently sat down with c-span to talk about his plans for the future. this is just under 40 minutes. >> has there been a defining moment for you as governor of minnesota? >> probably many, but i will give you two. one is the support we have given to the men and women in a national -- national military, and the national guard. we have stepped up in unprecedented ways to support them. we lead the nation in the beyond the yellow ribbon campaign. the other thing, for minnesota, i am in stick it has been liberal through history, and for me to draw a line on driving down government spending and will be on cutting taxes is something i'm also proud of. >> the president has said that next year in july 2011, it is a tra
control right there on park avenue. thanks so much for being with us. man, a lot of news today. glad we're able to get you through it. look for it again tomorrow and tonight at 8:00 pl on t.m. on t primetime edition of "rick's list." hope to see you there. now wolf blitzer. >> workers forced overboard off an oil rig and forcing new pollution fears in the gulf of mexico. >>> also, warnings stretching from north carolina to new england to canada as a massive storm bears down on the east coast. we'll get the latest from the director of the national hurricane center. he's standing by live. and russia's military is blowing up tanks and missile launchers with a lot of air. we'll show you what's behind this secret inflatable arsenal. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with the breaking news. an oil and gas production platform caught fire in the gulf of mexico today about 100 miles off the coast of louisiana. mariner energy, the company that owns the platform, says the fire began at one of seven active wells connected to the rig. 13 workers were forced overboard, but
this is a letter we got from maxim u.s. we're federal services. experts on appeals. medicare hired us to review this file and decide if the partd plan made the correct decision. we work for medicare. we do not work for part-d plan. we appealed and my wife won wholly. so the administrative law judge process. maxim u.s. has appealed that a decision and they say according to the term medically accepted indication includes only fda uses and those off dated uses supported by citation on one of the listed drugs. more over, medically accepted indication does not including treating physician testimony or proffer of medical efforts showing a drug as prescribed effectively treats the condition for which it's being used. converse easily could have included expert testimony as a source material for determining medically accepted uses if he wanted to do so. instead congress by reference to a drugs fda label and expert opinions in one of several drug. accordingly. medical accept the use is not the same as medically necessary. >> i would like to, we worked on issues like that so. we could be of help to you.
to >> let us know whether you'd eat that salmon. we've been talking about it in the newsroom. >> you could eat more of it for the same price. would you want to? >>> we begin with the big buzz in washington over a new book by bob woodward, it's called "obama's wars" and paints a picture of a president who was anxious to get out of afghanistan. >> ed henry joins us live from the big house on pennsylvania avenue this morning with the developing story. ed, if the story is accurate and bob woodward is known to be accurate, this president has had a touchy relationship with his top military people. >> you're right. we don't have a copy of the book yet, but it has a track record, published a couple dozen books, most of them considered pretty darn accurate. this is going to be a difficult story for this white house to handle. if you go through the details of this. broad brush we've known that there's division, there has been division, there's division in every administration over war, policy, et cetera. the extent, the details spilling out cannot be good for the whi
" reporter andrew zajac. and a discussion on the u.s. labor market with economist j. bradford delong. this is "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] caller: caller: caller: caller: caller: host: general petraeus, secretary clayton -- glenn beck, among others, agreed that the dove out of reach center should not burn at the koran on the anniversary of the 9/11 terror attacks. now we want your opinion whether you see it as a free-speech issue or not. you can see the numbers on the screen this morning. for the first 45 minutes we will be talking about this and going through the newspapers. you can also send us a tweak to -- tweet, tweet -- here are a couple of articles about this. it has become headlines everywhere. u.s. embassies brace for karan burning protests. this is from the associated press. governor andate's u.s. embassies around the world preparing. from "the washington examiner" newspaper here in washington -- again, that is in "the washington
bowers is in portage, wisconsin to bring us up to date. good morning, cindy. >> reporter: good morning, maggie. this earthen he levee is part of a series of dikes built mostly sand way back in the 1890s. sunday parts began to erode or give way as people in the historic town of portage are seeing the wisconsin river at its highest level since 1938. here in portage, the wisconsin river reached 20.5 feet sunday. that's even higher than the predicted crest, which forecastrs said wouldn't come until later today. 300 residents were asked to evacuate but those who stayed behind were trapped when local highways were shut down. >> they told us that we have -- that we had ten minutes to get out of there because they are blocking off all the roads back there. >> reporter: all this flooding was the result of extraordinarily heavy rains that fell across the upper midwest last week, as much as 10 to 12 inches in some areas. in the western wisconsin town of arcadia, some folks were allowed to return to their homes only to find their belongings water-logged. >> phone calls from a few friends letting m
this is not the end of that. a lot more to go. go more years. that does it for us. i'm eric shawn. >>amie: i'm jamie colby. good to have you with us. we'll send you to washington now, much more news with shannon bream. have a great day and good have a great day and good holiday. t99captioned bypclosed c >> shannon: economic push. president obama is ready to unveil the latest plan to fix the economy. does he have the right prescription? and march to the midterm, if the president can help the economy, will it help the democrats face uphill battle in november? stem cell debate. legal ruling stops funding of embryonic stem cell research. ethics versus scientific process? we have a fair and balanced debate on that coming up. i'm shannon bream. live from the nation's capital starts right now. the obama administration seems eager to talk about the economy, but does america like what it's hearing? mr. obama put a spin on weak job numbers and now he is pushing ideas to spur economic growth. julie kirtz is standing by with more on that. >> reporter: he is going to visit two swing states and
're document, and engaging in a discussion. here are the phone numbers. if you are a democrat, join us. rep conditions, join us, and independents, join us. good morning once again, this is the kind of discussion i can promise you would only happen on c-span. 34 years ago we used to call us the place where the constitution came to live every day, because it gave you a running example of the three branches of government and the live coverage of the congress, executive branch and what we told you about the supreme court so we couldn't let constitution day go by without a discussion. seems like we're hearing more and more about it these days, and on the front page of the washington times in a story about constitution day, david eisner who runs the national constitution center in philadelphia explains why. here is the story. he writes -- the tea party has got people thinking more seriously about what's in the constitution and what's not. that's the quote from the political analyst with american enterprise institute but they say it would be wrong to assume tea party movement was -- >> supreme cou
think someone can come up with the exact figure, and all of the resources being used for a human destruction, why can they not be used to improve the quality of life, living conditions, and the structure, and given a future to the people of india? [unintelligible] this mahomet gandhi was alive today, what kind of device which he did to the indian leadership? >> we will take that as a comment, not a question. [laughter] the gentleman in the back. >> we are prisoners of the past. when you talk about military, there are at least two wars in the past. we have to project that in a linear fashion. i would like you to comment on the macro side in the sense that the borders were imposed by the british on the locals. the chinese border was [unintelligible] then, [unintelligible] acted on his temper, winston churchill -- and his emperor, winston churchill. why is this border so solid? secondly, on pakistan, you have an enormous tragedy. what are the opportunities for the bigger the deal maker? >> let me comment on that, not the last part, because we are still discovering what is happening
discontent and focus on social crisis. "u.s. unemployment stands at 9.6%, with michigan at 13.1%. those who do not have jobs are anxious about losing them and watching their benefits declined. incomes are down, and many people are fighting health care expensive or lacking coverage altogether. for many, retirement seems but a dream. the the union is trying to tap into worker discontent and re- commit itself to broader social and justice issues in an effort to rejuvenate its sunken membership level." in "the new york times" there is an article about anna burger. "after all light and labor, a union leader retires, frustrated. she has dedicated her life to building the labor movement but has in nonetheless grown smaller and weaker. beyond a stepping down debt from of federation represents 5 million union members, she is retiring from her job of 14 years as secretary-treasurer of the powerful service employees international union, representing 2 million janitors and other hospital workers. many women have far too hard a time of balancing jobs and family. she is frustrated that unio
pensions were rewards of for a long work, and we used to regulate labor markets for companies. the retirement age, the existence of retirement age in our society is a function of decisions, both of increased productivity in the last century and decisions we made about allocating leisure. much of the leisure we chose to take from increased productivity went into shorter workweeks, went into longer vacations, earlier than in the last century, before say the 1950's. after the 1940's or so, much of the increased leisure went into what we call retirement, a time of non-work. we created this institution. it is malleable to some extent. it is also terribly important. the yearly retirement story is interesting. it begins to some extent with the unions very successfully negotiating 30-year and out early retirement options, and many of the unions that have defined benefits in many of the businesses agreed to early retirement provisions that served the purpose of on the one hand, rewarding workers for long-term service, and two, turning over the labor force. i say that because the flip s
commercial banking system to underpin and facilitate this u.s. economy of ours which is so great. it is time that the largest financial institutions in my words experience a little more tough love. no one escapes. that is it say we should not be tough because they deserve a threshing, because we need sound, robust banks in this country. today, i have offered only a few examples of the complexity of the issues that lawmakers, regulators, and the financial industry face. as with any piece of legislation, some within the public believe it falls far short of its goal. others believe it goes far too far. for the moment, we must implement it as prescribed. it is the law. opponents who are working hard to weaken its implementation and struggling to find loopholes already. others are insisting that it be implemented quickly and without exception as to the broad rules outlined in the legislation. this is to be expected and is part of our political and our capitalistic system. for example, the resolution process that i mentioned includes provisions that could leave it susceptible to political consider
think will enable us to resolve all of the outstanding issues. these are legitimacy and security. just as you expect us to be ready to recognize a palestinian state as the nation state of the palestinian people, we expect you to be prepared to recognize israel as the nation-state of the jewish people. there are more than 1 million non-jews living in israel, the nation-state of the jewish people, who have a full civil rights. there's no contradiction between a nation-state that guarantees the national rights of the majority of about guaranteeing the civil rights, full civil equality, of the minority. i think this mutual recognition between us is indispensable to clarify to our two peoples that the conflict between us is over. i said, to come yesterday that a real peace must take into account the genuine security of the individual that have changed since i was last year -- since i was last year at this table. we have been here before. refashioned those two agreements 12 years ago. in these 12 years, and new forces have arisen in our region and we have had the rise of miron and missile wa
minutes november? if you want to weigh in via e-mail as well, you can do so. and if you want to use twitter. again, we take our focus for the 45 minutes for the front page story in the "wall street journal" this morning. taking a look at political story with speaker pelosi. this is out of washington. they write so it talks about the political journey that will take, the paper talks more about that. but for our 45 minutes we're using this as a springboard to hear from democrats only. we'll take e-mail and twitter affouf this question, too. one more section from the interior pages of the same story. the writers write this morning. so the numbers will be on your screen. to your calls looking at speaker pelosi this november. portland, yorle, on -- oregon, on our line who thinks she will help. caller: i think nancy pelosi has been consistent and correct in her political decisions. i think she is definitely good for the country. and we small -- small african american community are very strong supporters. i think that the media is kind of hyped up all the predictions about shrinking democr
putting on for a press conference to talk to us first on fox. sheriff joe in a minute. but first, the monster and the mess. your world on top of earl's collision course with our coast and what could be a collision course with cavuto and more on earl in a minute with north carolina's governor with evacuations underway and what local governments say unions are doing. in a few words, "sucking them dry." in the case of illinois, have of the state is in the red and making sure they do not declare bankruptcy and as well as harrisburg, pennsylvania, which cannot make a bond agreement but better not thing of going bankrupt. the worry is, they go under and public workers and their pensions go bust, to which one says "tough." well, that seems inevitable if the cities or states go under and they are fighting it tooth and nail. what happens? >>guest: i should say be reasonable and think of a solution. for example, if we cap the retirement age at 65 and we let people retire only at 65 and we cap the pension at 100,000 a year which is a lot of money, twice the average household income, these s
. those who stayed behind were trapped when local highways were shut down. >> they told us we have -- that we had 10 minutes to get out of there because they are blocking off all of the roads back there. >> reporter: all of this flooding was the result of extraordinarily heavy rains that fell across the upper midwest last week, as much as 10 to 12 inches in some areas. in the western wisconsin town of arcadia, some folks were allowed to return to homes only to find their belongings waterlogged. >> phone calls from friends letting me know that flooding was occurring so i got up and my house was already full. >> reporter: water and mud wiped out everything in troy's basement and garage, even his new car. flood insurance will cover the damage but money isn't always enough. this was his grandparents' pool table. >> sentimental, you can't replace that. >> reporter: south dakota saw its worst flooding in 20 years. sunday the big sioux river was above flood stage. >> boy, you better get my stuff. >> reporter: 60 homes and 20 businesses were lost in zumbro falls. sweeping more than 12 feet
will join us. andrew ross sorkin, and eugene robinson, all coming up today on "morning joe." good lineup. >> we've got a very good lineup and a lot to get to. >> we'll start with the news. with the midterm elections fast approaching, president obama rolling out new finishives to boost the economy. and tomorrow in cleveland, the president will reportedly propose a permanent extension of tax credits for business owners to invest in research and development. also on the table a plan to allow companies to write off 100% of their investments in new plants and equipment through the end of next year. yesterday in milwaukee, the president announced a proposal to invest in new roads and railways. the $50 initiative is a six-year plan that would create a government-run bank to finance transportation projects. the white house says it would create jobs by improving and expanding $150,000 miles of the nation's roads, 4,000 miles of railways, and 150 miles of airport runways. although president obama says the plan will be fully paid for, and will not add to the deficit, republican leaders like john bo
an incumbent is smaller. they argue if they can bad brush us as corrupt incumbents they can go after the fact nobody knows who they are. >> the point here is that the hour is late and polling is grim. there's not a lot that candidates can do at this late hour. if you're in the south, a democratic candidate in the south, mountain west, lots of regions in this country, your house speaker is in trouble popularity wise. your president is not that popular. the health care reform plan is not that popular. you have a big drag out there and you have to throw whatever you have out there. despite the success of a democratic legislative agenda, not getting traction. you have to throw something out there and it's often a negative ad. >> i'm thinking the old song "strangers in the night" which is the only number one song frank ever sang. it was a hell of a song. you can build a case about a stranger you can't build about an ike skelton or guy or woman who's been around for a while. you can commit infant size. go after the person before anybody knows who they are. christine o'donnell, all we know about her
protests in tehran, trying to exploited anger against the u.s. because of threats to burn the koran and the controversy over the proposed islamic cultural center near ground zero. president ahmadinejad, blames all this on what he calls a zionist conspiracy. >> translator: we believe there is a minority in the united states and they are zionists. they have no religion. they believe in no religion. >> there are jewish leaders working with muslim leaders to build the cultural center in new york city. there's no evidence of elite what you call zionists groups against it. fidel castro, your old friend, fi dell castro, criticized you for your comments about israel and -- >> translator: i need to talk, to speak. >> excuse me. >> translator: i think you should finish first, and then you should let me explain. >> speak. >> translator: what you see in islamic countries is what the people are against, that ugly behavior. they are not against the people of the united states, they are not against americans. >> we see no evidence that there is any such zionist con spour si. >> reporter: he was eq
the good news is we have spoken to the carl paladino campaign and they assured us they put one in the mail to us. we are eager to receive it and will show it to you in smell oh vision. angry, angry smell oh vision. hulk smash! "countdown with keith olbermann" starts now. >>> which of these stories will you be talking about tomorrow? the democrats standing up and fighting. immigration reform to be central to the midterms. the dream that is the dream act. the path for citizenship through military service. >> i know that many of you campaigned hard for me. and understandably you're frustrated that we have not been able to move this over the finish line yet. i will not walk away from this fight. >> our special guest, congressman luis gutierrez of illinois. >>> karl rove frogmarched out of fox news now claims he endorsed christine o'donnell. >> i endorsed her the other night. i said, i'm for the republican in every case. >> this is how he endorsed her. >> again, the serious questions about how does she make her living? why did she mislead voters about her college education? we'll se
to you about well this weekend, i have to go back to mississippi for a family reunion. >> give us a brief idea of what the book is about? >> the book is about the defection of 6 million african-americans from the south to the north, mid-west to the west. from 1915-1970 when the south began truly to change. >> i went to a movie last weekend. they handed me this as i went in. i'll read it to you. everyday more migrants are coming no the cities to seek a better life for their children. >> i wrote this book thinking of any country. it's a movie about the last train home where they have 150 million migrant that's live in the city each year. i want to talk to you about what you have written in the front of your book by richard wright. >> who was he and why did you pick him? >> richard wright was one of the greatest novelists of the 20 j century. he was a migrant from mississippi to chicago. he was the son of a share cropper and always wanted to write. i set out in 1927 to get to chicago. he spent almost his entire career. almost everything he wrote had to do with understanding the migrant exper
experience in washington. it was a national outpouring of people. >> just give us a brief synopsis of what the book is about. >> the book is about the migration experiences of three people that have become part of the larger whole, which was the defection of 6 million african americans from the south to the north, to the midwest and west from 1915, world war i until 1970. >> i went to a movie last weekend. they handed me this. i want to read it to you. every day, more migrants are coming into the cities to seek a better life for their children. the scale of this massive migration from the poor countryside to the burgeoning cities is unprecedented in human history. the migrants provide a cheap source of labor booming cities and the thriving economy is built on the backs of those citizens. do you have any idea what country that is? >> i am thinking the united states. i wrote this book with the idea that it would refer to almost every immigrant that crossed the atlantic or the pacific ocean in order to come here. >> it is the movie called "the last train home." they had 130 million migrants t
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)